Freshly Seen

Freshly Seen at Jill’s Scene during July

By Andr.V.S. [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Woman Reading, Andrew Stevovich

Once a month in Freshly Seen at Jill’s Scene I share with you, my readers, some of the posts that have intrigued, fascinated and educated me. They  are posts that have set my synapses sparking, my fingers tapping, the tweets flying, and the shares zapping about the  blogosphere.

My self-imposed rules are simple enough but not necessarily easy to apply:

1) Only three posts per month. Yet to be achieved

2) There’s a two month stand down for previously featured bloggers. (Talk about making it hard on myself, I do have my favourites!)  But so far so good.

3) For a post to feature on Freshly Seen it will have made me laugh, or cry or think – sometimes all three at once. Fully achieved, each and every time.

So this month on Freshly Seen let me introduce:

Image Reboot #4

I’m already stretching the rules a bit because with this one you’re getting two for the price of one. Over on Photo 101 Rehab, a frequently flying scientist, Desleyjane, explains how she used Lightroom to transform an ordinary, you could say dull, image into something quite spectacular.  While you’re there take a  look at Lucile’s portraits, I’m fascinated by them.

What is an Object that has meaning for you? Letter from Albert Einstein

As part of last week’s Cherished Blogfest Eileen shared a letter from Albert Einstein to her father. The object itself is fascinating, a letter signed by the brilliant man. Wow! And double wow!!

But it is the sentiments Einstein reveals that gave me pause for thought. The very same sentiments, that preoccupy so many of us now, some seventy years later.

It’s winter in New Zealand. I blame earth’s axial tilt.

Keeping with the science theme I’ve got going this month (photography’s as much a science as an art, right) and my recent preoccupation with the Kirk Sundial, Mathew Wright’s post all about Earth’s axial tilt landed in my inbox at just the right time.

Believe it or not, despite the erudite subject matter, there was a laugh or two along the way  – to do with the planet after Saturn, you know the one.

Desleyjane, Eileen, and Mathew, thank-you for educating and informing me, and providing a laugh or two along the way.

There you have it folks, the three Freshly Seen posts, plus one extra, for this July. Check them out, I think they’re like brain food for bloggers but what do you think?

Categories: Freshly Seen

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17 replies »

  1. Thanks Jill as Pauline commented all interesting.
    Especially Einstein’s letter,
    Scientists have given us so much.
    The thing is how is it being used or misused and abused.

    The atomic bomb was tested in Mexico so its devastating effects were known.
    Later the Japanese government was warned that they would be wiped out.
    No mention of an atomic bomb and in any case would the Japanese have believed them.
    July 1945 the Japanese were warned. On 6th August 129,000 people were murdered in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
    I do not think Einstein was asked whether he approved of this.
    Perhaps he regrets his letter came a bit too late.

    The New Zealanders had the moral strength to declare NZ a nuclear free zone in 1984.
    Check out this Jill you can trust an old bloke like me to have an accurate memory.
    We should not trust any bodies memory or opinion for that matter.

    Like

    • What a great comment for today, Jack, the 70th anniversary of the dropping of the bomb. We were told it meant the end of the war but what a terrible, terrible price for Japan, actually for all of us. And yes, it was a proud day when David Lange declared NZ nuclear free.

      Like

    • With so many millions of posts put up each month, it’s difficult to know where to begin to look. This is my attempt to shine a light on a few of those that I enjoy, so that others can, too. Thanks so much for visiting and commenting, Curt.

      Liked by 1 person

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